Vegan Dorayaki (Japanese Pancake with Azuki Bean Paste + Black Sesame Filling)

全植物純素全麥銅鑼燒 紅豆餡+黑芝麻 Vegan Dorayaki

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Soft pancakes filled with sweet azuki bean paste, Dorayaki is a Japanese snack/dessert I love since a kid. Usually, it’s not vegan. And since I became a vegan, why not make a vegan dorayaki? Oh, and I sneak in some whole wheat flour to make it more nutritious.

全植物純素全麥銅鑼燒 紅豆餡+黑芝麻 Vegan Dorayaki

If you grew up in Taiwan as I do, dorayaki should be no stranger to you. I remember when I was little, my mom often bought dorayaki from a Japanese bakery for my sister and me as a snack. The soft pancakes with red bean paste were so delicious that I could not forget.

But dorayaki is usually made with eggs and dairy, making it not vegan-friendly. But I really miss the taste of dorayaki the other day. So, I decided to make it by my self!

Traditional dorayaki is actually super easy to make. Just like making pancakes, it’s basically stirring and mixing. But without eggs, the texture of dorayaki will change. That’s why this recipe took me a while to test, 4 times to be exact, to achieve the ideal texture.

Watch How to Make It >>

Ingredients You Need for Dorayaki

  • Flour: Basically I will recommend using all-purpose flour, cake flour, or a mixture of both, which is also what I use in this recipe. I also add a little whole wheat flour to make it more nutritious.
  • Organic Icing sugar: It’s basically ground cane sugar. I make my own by grinding some organic cane sugar in my grinder.
  • Baking powder & Baking soda: Because there’s no egg in this recipe, we will need something to “raise” the pancakes. That’s what these two things will do.
  • Mirin: It might seem unimportant but it’s actually a crucial role in making this dorayaki “dorayaki.” Without it, it just feels like something is missing.
  • Soy milk: You can use either unsweetened or sweetened. If you use sweetened, the final dorayaki will be just a little bit sweeter than the ones made with unsweetened soy milk.
  • Red bean paste/Azuki bean paste: This is the classic filling for dorayaki. You can use homemade red bean paste or a store-bought one.

There’s one ingredient that’s optional: Soy sauce, which will give out a tad of color for the dorayaki. Just a little bit will be enough.

全植物純素全麥銅鑼燒 紅豆餡+黑芝麻 Vegan Dorayaki

How to Make Vegan Dorayaki

Making vegan dorayaki is pretty much the same as making usual dorayaki. I’ll suggest making filling and store them in the fridge until about to use.

For the pancakes: Sift all dry ingredients first into a big bowl and mix them together. Then make a hole in the middle and add the wet ingredients. Mix until all incorporate.

Then cover the bowl with a cloth and let it sit for 10 minutes.

After that, place a non-stick pan over medium heat. Slightly oil the pan.

Place your hand over the middle of the pan, about 5 cm above. If you feel the hot air coming to your palm, then it’s ready.

Scoop 2 Tbsp of the batter into the pan to make one small pancake. You can cook many at the same time depending on the size of your pan. Just make sure to save some room for flipping.

Cook the first side for 2~3 minutes until you see many bubbles on the pancakes. Flip and cook for another 30~60 seconds. Repeat to finish all the batter. This recipe will make 10 small 6-cm pancakes, so 5 dorayaki in total.

Let the cooked pancakes cool completely. Then you can scoop some azuki bean paste onto one pancake and press another to sandwich the paste. I also make some black sesame filling this time because I love black sesame. (Recipe down below)

全植物純素全麥銅鑼燒 紅豆餡+黑芝麻 Vegan Dorayaki

These dorayaki pancakes are not very sweet, which strikes a great balance with the sweet red bean paste filling. It’s sweet, satisfying without being overpoweringly sweet.

How to Store Vegan Dorayaki

If you don’t plan to eat them right sooner, I’ll recommend storing them in an air-tight container in the fridge. They should be fine in the fridge for 3~5 days.

When about to eat, you can enjoy them straight out from the fridge or let them sit at room temperature for 5 minutes so it’s not chilled.

全植物純素全麥銅鑼燒 紅豆餡+黑芝麻 Vegan Dorayaki

That’s it! I hope you love this vegan dorayaki as well. I personally love enjoying them straight out from the fridge for the chilled feeling, especially in summer!

Vegan Whole Wheat Dorayaki (Japanese Pancake with Azuki Bean + Black Sesame Filling)

Soft pancakes filled with sweet azuki bean paste, Dorayaki is a Japanese snack/dessert I love since a kid. Usually, it’s not vegan. And since I became a vegan, why not make a vegan dorayaki? Oh, and I sneak in some whole wheat flour to make it more nutritious.
Author: Barrel Leaf
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Resting10 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: Japanese, vegan
Keyword: Asian recipe, dairy-free, red bean, vegan, whole wheat
Servings: 5 people

Ingredients

For the Pancakes

  • 70 g cake flour, I use whole wheat pastry flour
  • 30 g all-purpose flour
  • 15 g whole wheat flour, or just use cake flour
  • 25 g organic icing sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 160 g soy milk
  • 2 Tbsp mirin
  • 1/4 tsp soy sauce
  • 5 g cocont oil, or vegan butter

For the red bean paste filling

For the sesame paste filling

  • 10 g cornstarch
  • 15 g ground black sesame
  • 100 g unsweetened soy milk
  • 20 g organic sugar
  • 45 g black sesame paste, I use homemade sesame paste
  • 5 g coconut oil

Instructions

First, make the red bean paste:

  • You can follow this recipe to make red bean paste or use canned sweetened red beans and do the following steps.
  • Add the canned sweetened red beans and cornstarch to a small pot. Mix them together and cook them over medium heat. Keep stiring at the same time until it's thickened.
  • Transfer the red bean paste into a bowl and let to cool down completely. Store it in the fridge while we make the other filling and pancakes.

To make the black sesame paste filling:

  • Add cornstarch, soy milk, and ground black sesame to a small pot. Mix them together.
  • Then cook the mixture over small heat. Stir in the sugar. Cook and keep stiring until the mixture thicken up. This filling will turn thicker very quick so make sure to pay attention to the texture. You don’t need to cook too long.
  • Remove the pot from the heat and fold in the black sesame paste and coconut oil. You can add 1~2 Tbsp of ground black sesame or black sesame paste to make the whole flavor more rich.
  • Transfer the mixture to a small bowl and store it in the fridge.

To make the pancakes:

  • Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, and icing sugar into a big bowl. Mix them together.
  • Make a hole in the middle and add the wet ingredients. Mix until all incorporate.
  • Cover the bowl with a cloth and let it sit for 10 minutes.
  • Place a non-stick pan over medium heat. Place your hand over the middle of the pan, about 5 cm above. If you feel the hot air coming to your palm, then it’s ready.
  • Slightly oil the pan. Then add 2 Tbsp of the batter into the pan to make one small pancake. You can cook many at the same time depending on the size of your pan. Just make sure to save some room for fliping.
  • Cook the first side for 2~3 minutes until you see many bubbles on the pancakes. Flip and cook for another 30~60 seconds. Repeat to finish all the batter. This recipe will make 10 small 6-cm pancakes, so 5 dorayaki in total.
  • Let the cooked pancakes cool completely. Then your can scoop some azuki bean paste or black sesame paste filling onto one pancake and press another to sandwich the paste.

Video


Notes

  • Storage: Store in an air-tight container in the fridge for 3~5 days.

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